Don’t blame the immigrants — it’s our laws that are criminal

Migrants who were on a flight sent by Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis gather with their belongings outside St. Andrews Episcopal Church on Sept. 14 in Edgartown, Massachusetts on Martha’s Vineyard.

AP Photos

America needs more immigrants, but we seem determined to shoot ourselves in the foot. Before addressing that self-sabotage, permit a small digression.

In the 1980s, Venezuela was the wealthiest country in Latin America. Sitting on about 18% of the world’s proven oil reserves, Venezuelans enjoyed higher living standards than their neighbors and seemed to have a stable democracy. Looks were deceiving. When the price of oil plummeted in the 1990s, the country was plunged into instability. In 1999, they elected a charismatic military officer, Hugo Chavez, who promised to redistribute the nation’s wealth and proceeded to befriend Fidel Castro and destroy the nation’s economy.

He nationalized companies and farms, crushed labor unions, put opponents in prison and seized the assets of foreign oil contractors. Chavez succumbed to cancer in 2013, but by then Venezuela was a basket case. Today, one in three Venezuelans doesn’t get enough to eat, malnutrition among poor children is rife, and more than 75% of Venezuelans live in extreme poverty. It is the most abrupt collapse of a thriving nation not at war on record, and a cautionary tale about what can happen when people make bad political choices.

Most of the 50 immigrants Gov. Ron DeSantis dropped on Martha’s Vineyard were Venezuelans who had made an arduous 2,000-mile journey. “No one leaves home,” wrote poet Warsan Shire, “unless home is the mouth of a shark.”

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Many on the right portray undocumented immigrants as criminals who are “breaking into our house” and deserve to be treated as such. Under U.S. statutes, if a migrant comes into this country, turns himself in to a border guard or other authority and asks for political asylum, he is entitled to a hearing. Asylum seekers are not “illegal” immigrants.

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DeSantis didn’t see suffering human beings. He saw props. He saw Fox News coverage. (Fox, unlike the governor of Massachusetts, was tipped off in advance.) And he saw the chance to show the GOP base what a jerk he could be.

The DeSantis justifiers object that border states are being flooded with undocumented immigrants and that it’s unjust that red states are bearing all of the burden. But the border states are not handling it alone. The federal government has spent roughly $333 billion on border security and immigration enforcement in the past 19 years, with much of it targeted on the southern border. As for the burden of immigration, it’s debatable that immigrants represent a burden …read more

Source:: Chicago Sun Times

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